Posts Tagged ‘sarah leigh’s style files’

What’s Hot in 2010 by Sarah Leigh

January 16, 2010

null

After a brief hiatus, Sarah returns with her third contribution to the Fold, offering some insider tips on what’s hot for the coming year in fashion, music, art and style.

A little late in the day, and vastly covered by the glossies, but I thought I’d put in my two cents on who (and what) will be unmissable in 2010. From the new set of rock and pop stars to inspirational TV dramas and the latest fashion trends, read on for an essential guide to ‘what’s hot’ for the coming year.

Marina and the Diamonds

null

Half Welsh, half Greek Marina Diamandis gained a lot of press last year for her catchy rock-tinged pop and retro pinup persona. 2010 will see big things for this 24 year-old songstress, her latest single Hollywood, from her eagerly awaited debut album The Family Jewels, is possibly the most memorable song of the New Year. Her love of combining 50’s style bodysuits with opaque tights and 80’s shoulder-padded jackets (with a good measure of fringing and sequins) has and will earn her some serious fashion stripes in the months to come too.

The return of Big Love

null

Many of you know, and indeed understand my unwavering style-admiration for Chloe Sevigny, and not only does this woman know how to dress herself (or employ a rather talented person who does), but she can act too. Over here in the UK we only got the first season of Big Love, but on the other side of the pond season 4 has just begun on HBO. If Sevigny’s prairie chic attire and polygamous credit card wielding, serial shopping alter ego isn’t reason enough to tune in, then news that original indie queen Sissy Spacek features in this run should be! I’m predicting big things for a prairie inspired look this summer, and Sevigny could just provide the inspiration you need!

I suggest you get on the WWW and download (legally please children) the back catalogue immediately, or buy the boxset on DVD (region 1), or for those of you lucky enough to receive HBO – tune in damn it!

Michael Van Der Ham

null

The Dutch Central Saint Martin’s graduate has appropriately taken the fashion and celebrity dressing world by storm, and to be honest I can hardly wait to see what 2010 will see from Mr V D Ham. Autumn/winter 09/10 saw his black and gold asymmetric brocade creations, while spring/summer 10 bought about beautiful silk, satin and tulle lop-sided rusched mini-dresses and candy hued, metallic tinged separates…. Mmm mmm.

Sports Luxe

null

For womenswear this year, it’s all about a luxury approach to sportswear. With designer du jour Alexander Wang headlining the trend, 2010 will see jersey applied to just about garment, cycling shorts, knee high soccer socks, tennis skirts and wedge-heeled sneakers taking centre stage. For ultimate stylista points add a 90s grungy twist with laddered tights and don’t ditch those Ray-ban Wayfarers just yet.

The Temper Trap

null

It was Temper Trap’s latest single Fader that really made me sit up and take notice of the band. On a bigger scale, the Australian band attribute their new status to their recording sessions with UK producer Jim Abbiss (Adele, Arctic Monkeys). Last year members Dougy, Jonathan, Lorenzo and Toby moved from their native Melbourne to London, and immersed themselves in to the UK music scene, they have since embarked on a headline tour, played festivals up and down the country and been signed to US label Glassnote Recoreds; cue another appearance at the acclaimed South by Southwest festival.

Upon my first listen to their Fader track, I must say it immediately evoked a sense of nostalgia – reminding me of the soft 80’s rock that I love. Indeed, Temper Track are known for their atmospheric sound and pulsating drums. They’ve got a little something going on style wise too, with a nice collection of geek-chic specs, Campagnolo cycling caps and lead singer Dougie’s anarchic school boy charm.

Thom Kerr

null

Thom Kerr is my new favourite photographer (let’s face it, I need one since David LaChapelle semi-retired to some lake-side retreat). He combines a mixture of super-glossy fashion imagery with a little surrealism and ever-changing ethereal lighting, not to mention the fact that the accompanying track to his website is Mama Cass’ It’s Getting Better – what’s not to like.

Hailing from Australia, Kerr originally studied fine art film before stepping behind the lens in 2005. There are few image makers to take the industry by such force in such a small amount of time, and with clients already including O’Zine magazine, Christian Audigier and Warner Music, the only way is up.

Saoirse Ronan

null

Atonement’s little Briony Tallis is now nearly 15 and an Academy Award, Bafta and Golden Globe nominated actress. Her 2010-released effort, Irena in ‘The Way Back’, looks set to gain in further praise and acclaim.

The beautiful young Irish actress will swiftly take the reins from Emma Watson et all as Europe’s most interesting, talented and dynamic icon.

Letterman Jackets

null

Guys, if you purchase one thing this year make it a 1960s style American high school letterman jacket. We’re talking when Danny Zuko turns jock, preppy HSM types but with a teddy boy edge. The key is to mix it up, make it edgy, make it cool – combine it with different styles, granddad-chic, geek-chic, urban, city slicker – the choice is yours.

Sarah

SS10 Runway Trends by Sarah Leigh

October 18, 2009

null

In the second of our monthly contributions from blogger, magazine editor and friend of the Fold Sarah Leigh, Sarah looks at the recent runway season and picks out several key looks that will be big this coming spring/summer. You heard it here first!

I love fashion month, it’s a time of serious celebrity spotting, new trends, devouring the reviews and wishing you were just that little bit richer. It’s such a self-indulgent, frivolous, pretty ridiculous time; London’s cool kids wander from show to show in their craziest ensembles, Rihanna tries to ‘out-style’ everyone and the bloggers (like me) go in to caffeine-and-Sauvignon-Blanc-fuelled posting frenzies.

Of course, for us mere mortals, that are not Rihanna, it also marks a very important fashion shift. We can observe the latest, reoccurring trends, and then sit and wait for the Great British High Street to rip them all off. Cynical yes, handy for the wallet yes, shameful, no!

So, a few trends have popped up across the fashion weeks this season, of course NYC, London, Milan and Paris all have their own takes on each. New York tend to be a little more commercial and preppy, London goes a little wild, Milan plays it safe (so the multi-million Euro housewives buy in to it) and Paris… well, what you see in Paris will actually change the way people dress.

Colour Blocking
Colour blocking just keeps on coming as a seasonal staple. This summer’s key colours include sage or mint tones of green and hot orange. My looks-to-watch include Jean Paul Gaultier’s eighties take, complete with wide leg harem pants and Dr Martens, and Burberry’s candy-sweet chiffon and jersey ensemble; offset with taupe accessories. Mixing same-colour textures is also big news this season.

null

Future Warrior
Think William Wallace meets the year 2100, as seen at Rodarte in New York and Todd Lynn in London. Each fashion house combine earthen elements with chaotic styling and a truck load of attitude. Meanwhile, Balenciaga and Cheap & Chic take things more futuristically with straps, buckles and a whole load of leather. A key detail to note is the use of hoods and snoods – giving a mysterious, otherworldly edge.

null

Underwear as Outerwear
Underwear inspired garments have been a huge talking point this season, with Marc Jacobs kicking things off in shimmering style in New York. His satin balconette bras (worn over the blouses) and panelled pants accumulated an almost instant waiting list, while over in London Louise Goldin channelled Madonna circa 1990. Petite conical bras created eye-catching (!) features amongst her intricately constructed mini dresses.

null

Eclectic Styling
Marc Jacobs (or at least his stylist) must have spent a while in Harajuku this summer, because the styling for his collections for Marc by MJ and Louis Vuitton were definitely verging on the eccentric. ‘Mix and match’ also made its way to Milan in one of my favourite collections. D Squared 2’s Dean and Dan Caten successfully sent out a collection of models laden in all manner of hillbilly, trucker and camp trip paraphernalia – resulting in a rural mishmash of trashy splendour.

null

All White
Many designers decided to ‘wipe the slate clean’ this season – many remark as a sign of cleansing after recession. In my opinion the most successful were those who accompanied all white looks with minimal silhouettes and styling. In Paris, Jil Sander went for unusual pattern cutting and layered looks, while in New York Calvin Klein stuck with what they know best with plain low-neck singlets and oversized blazers.

null

Digital All-over Prints
2009 and 2010 have to be the years all over prints seriously made an impact on fashion. And there’s not many who do ‘digital’ as well as Alexander McQueen. Following on intermittently from his s/s 09 collection of fractal art prints, he returns with animalistic and ethereal symmetric designs. Symmetry is the winning formula for s/s 10, while florals are a front runner to be ‘digitalised’.

null

Grungy Knits
Thanks to the likes of fashion wonder kid Alexander Wang and his BFF Erin Wasson, grunge isn’t going anywhere fast. From spider web knits to downright tatty jumpers, 2010 will be the year of looking a little dishevelled. Worn and unfinished textures will also be big news – let’s hope for their price tag these knits don’t wear further.

null

‘Woodstock’s 40th Anniversary’ by Sarah Leigh

September 16, 2009

null

In an effort to expand and diversify our content we have asked Sarah Leigh, managing editor of trend forecasting site Mpdclick.com and author of Sarah Leigh’s Style Files to contribute a monthly article to our blog. Here is the first, a look at the 40th anniversary of seminal rock festival Woodstock and the numerous styles it spawned.

There’s something about the hippy movement of the 1960’s that makes me think they were on to something…and arguably you can, and many have compared the subculture’s heyday as similar to the time we now face.

For example, in 2009 there are a record number of communes and shared living arrangements popping up across the world –not places for oddball ‘free love’ types, but homes for like-minded creatives, seeking an alternative to the humdrums of reality. Yes, this, amongst other things, is a direct result of the economic downturn and recent political discord, but this mirrors the ethos of the 1960’s hippy whom occupied communes, promoted a bohemian care-free way of life and made music acts and festivals as infamous as we consider the likes of Woodstock are today.

null

Hippies stemmed from the Beat Generation of the 1950’s (pioneered by the likes of American writers including Allen Ginsberg), who sought a romantic desire for a spontaneous, independent existence following the strong intellectual undercurrent that swept the postwar era. The 1950’s were a time of readjusting to a post violent and economically unstable environment, just as 2009 sees wars continue in the Middle East and the global recession continue to blight society. As the 1960’s began, and hippy movements and collectives popped up across the globe, inspired by the values of the Beat Generation, off they went with their anti-war protests and proclamation of a ‘new dawn’.

null

Hippies turned to their alternative arts of street theatre, and synonymous music genres as a way of expressing their feelings and their protests. Hippies opposed political and social convention, choosing a gentle ideology that favored peace, love and personal freedom. 2009 has also seen the number of protests rise, most notably in a calm and orderly fashion, as documented in Welcome To The Fold’s September post Protest Chic, objecting against anything from war, to lack of money, to unemployment to climate change.

1969 saw the zenith of hippy culture; Woodstock. According to Rolling Stone magazine, Woodstock was one of the ’50 Moments That Changed the History of Rock and Roll’.

null

August 2009 saw the 40th anniversary of the now infamous music and art festival. The 1969 event and subsequent documentary movie cemented its place in history with bands like Grateful Dead and singers Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix playing to the 500,000 strong crowd at Max Yasgur’s dairy farm in White Lake, Sullivan County. The documentary movie, re-released on DVD this year captured the hedonistic weekend in all its glory, later receiving the Academy Award for Feature Documentary.

null

Over the years many have been inspired by the bohemian attitude and aesthetic of Woodstock, while many films and songs reference it, most recently director Ang Lee re-told the story featuring critically acclaimed young actors Demetri Martin and Emile Hirsch in ‘Taking Woodstock’. The comedy-drama is based on the memoir Taking Woodstock: A True Story of a Riot, a Concert, and a Life by Elliot Tiber and Tom Monte. Cue a barrage of 1960’s hippy get-up on the big screen.

Given the frequency with which hippie looks are richly revered and regularly revived, Woodstock’s anniversary spawned yet another resurgence. Spring/summer 2009 enjoyed bohemian headbands, floral maxi dresses, denim waistcoats and high-waisted denim flares.

The remarkable era looks set to drift well in to autumn/winter 09/10’s mindset; fashion power house Topshop’s latest trend ‘Marianne’ boasts “the fashion zeitgeist of the late 60s with glamorously bohemian pieces”, not to mention “rock-royalty shades…tarnished sequins…textured Mongolian gilets…and platform thigh boots [to] finish off the free loving rock-chic look”

null

Earlier on Style Files I documented the rise in Beatnik styling, using the film Almost Famous as inspiration for the look.

It’s not unusual for such an iconic event to influence fashion time and time again, but my question is will it ever stop? The bottom line is hippy and Beatnik infused trends are fail-safe and entirely commercial, with a shed load of differing looks to explore. Don’t give up on ‘boho’, if the economy and political landscape have anything to do with it, it’s a safe bet for at least another summer.