Posts Tagged ‘Jammer’

D Double E Interview

July 17, 2010

I caught up with D Double and the Dirtee Stank crew at the BBC as he was about to perform on the 5.19 show. After filming was done we went to the pub and, over a Bacardi and coke (double measures of course!) had a chat about Street Fighter, Newham Generals and the many upcoming projects he’s involved in. Bluku Bluku!

So, ‘Street Fighter Riddim’ is doing the rounds at the moment, Swerve produced it, are you two going to work together in future?

Yeah really want to do another tune with Swerve. Right now he’s got a lot of fire for me.

The collaboration seemed to come a little about out of the blue…

Yeah I’d never heard Swerve’s production – I never knew he produced until Laurence said ‘Ere listen mate, got a beat ‘ere’ and I was like ‘alright then let’s have a butchers.’ And yeah, I’m here! Big up Laurence, big up Swerve!

Have Capcom said anything? Do they want you on the next game?!
Yeah man, hopefully all that stuff will come after the tune. It’s in the pipeline, I mean we had to holla at them for the legalisation, so they know about us, but we re-did the sounds and FX anyway and I don’t think anyone can tell the difference! HADOUKEN! Hahaha!

After releasing your ‘Woooo Riddim’ version and ‘Street Fighter Riddim’, anticipation for the forthcoming DEE solo project is high. What can fans expect?

Boy, you can expect pure heat. If you liked the ‘Woooo Riddim’, ‘Street Fighter’ or ‘Hard’, then know what sort of avenue I’m taking.

Guest spots?

Producer-wise there is a couple of guest spots there. Footsie’s there, I’ve got a couple of tunes from Cage, Swerve, Swindle, Noah D and Skream. It’s an A-list roster…It’s gonna be live!

You produce as well as MC, can we expect any of your production efforts on there?

Definitely in the future, but at the moment I’m trying to pump out my vocals on the best beats and get my levels up in the background. Production is more of a hobby for me.

Part of the Newham Generals ‘Bag of Greeze E.P.’ is being produced by Skitz. What was it like working together?

Skitz has been about for time and he lives around the corner from my house so I’ve known him for a long time. Skitz is bless and used to work with Slew Dem a lot back in the day who are like my family.

The ‘I’m a General’ tune featuring the late Esco must have been a lot to record. Was it an emotional experience?

Erm…It was kind of, but at the same time it was a good feeling to promote and showcase his talent again. We wanted to show love. He never got his chance to shine so we helped out a bit.

I read an interview you gave with the Guardian back in 2004 where you said you were tired of listening to 14 year olds chat about guns, and that you wanted to go lyrically deeper with your music. What does Grime say to you today and do you feel able to express yourself fully on it?

Grime has got a lot lighter, it’s still dark, but it has definitely lightened up. Stations like KISS, 1Xtra and Radio 1 are starting to play us now so we all have to straighten out a bit. It’s getting more professional and the production is levelling as well.

Does Grime still give you the same feeling as it did back in the day?

Definitely man, I can listen to Grime beats all day. It still hits me and I like the way it’s getting wider. Tunes like ‘Rescue Me’ by Skepta [for example] aren’t strictly ‘Grime’, but they have that element. It has that home base. I like anything that has that home base in there.

Talking of success, Chipmunk, Tinchy and Tinie are finding high chart positions, and Jammer, Skepta and yourself are starting to position yourselves for the same. However, whereas they made their music a bit sweeter, you guys have been able to stay true to your sound and still find new audiences. Did they ‘open the doors’ for you in that sense?

I think they have made it easier, but not because of what they’ve done. People are moving away from the scene, so the people like me left at the core are able to represent more fully. They aren’t repping what we come from. You hear a mixtape and there might be a couple of hard tracks on there, but their core fans don’t get Grime.

They are helping in the way that, if they have an interview they will talk about what they’ve done before and who we are.

You have been noted as being ahead of your time, and you’ve said that you still perform lyrics still you wrote at 15. What lyrics were they?

Err…yeah, you know “If you you, you you/ Wanna come against I-I, I-I” that was from then, “me nah ramp, me nah skin/” Ah there’s so many, I’ve got a big selection of lyrics.

Your lyric repertoire is big, but how do you keep going on sets?

It’s natural for me. I don’t really need to make that much of an effort to lift-off as I used to. It’s just there bruv. I could be here mucking about and say something and I could make it into the deepest thing.

Has that happened recently?

Yeah man, it happened with ‘Hard.’ We put that together quickly! ‘Street Fighter’ was so quick, all I need to do is feel free, have the beat playing and bubble.

How would you say you’ve developed since the Jungle days?

I’ve got more professional with the lyrics. On Jungle I couldn’t really go into depth ‘cos of the tempo, Hip Hop was a bit too slow and Grime was just right. I found I could go in more. Now I can spit at 140 (bpm), 160, whatever.

You and Footsie together with DJ Tubby have forged a niche spitting over Dubstep, and have become known for it. Is it more exciting to spit over than regular Grime?

I prefer to ride Grime because it gives me the time to do what I need to – maybe a bit too much time sometimes! You know, if a DJ’s playing for two hours it’s like ‘Rah I might run out of power’ on dubstep though, there are tunes there that you can’t ride, they’re too big. You’re still ready to leng, but you’re also a host.

With Grime it’s flat out. You can spit your heart out for half an hour with hype and then the tune you love best comes in and you’re like ‘shit!’ So yeah, I think Grime is better to practice and MC to.

What do you think about other MC’s jumping on it?

It’s alright, it’s a good move but I think Dubstep is slightly different. You can’t really do too many deep songs on it; the instrumentals have as much power as the vocals. With the beat already there, as an MC you need only add a couple of spicy lines and it’s gone, maxed out. With Grime you have to add your own energy and build on the beat.

Some people sound good on it, some don’t.

As a FWD>> veteran, what has performing there done for your repertoire?

FWD>> was my introduction to Dubstep. Tubby and Footsie brought me in on that, I was all Grime-d out, whereas they were into their Dub. But FWD>> was a time where I got to see another world and build on it. Now, Dubstep is massive and it’s cool man.

You’ve worked with Breakage and Skream, are there any other people you would like to work with?

Yeah, I’m working with Noah D, I want to do a tune with Chromestar, Caspa, Plastician…anyone that has the bangers. They know what I can do!

Let’s talk about ‘Generally Speaking.’ I heard you spit on DJ MK’s kiss show and you said ‘Generally Speaking means a lot to me.’ What does that CD mean to you?

It’s a benchmark. It was the first official release and there will be a lot more to come. That was number one…

What was the recording process like?

It was long – over quite a stretch of time. Some of the tunes that were on the finalised track listing were some of the last ones we recorded. We had so many to consider, it was like a puzzle trying to fit it all together.

Will any of the off cuts make it onto the new CD?

Nah man, that’ll all be fresh stuff. We got some tunes that we’ll pump out in the meantime but the next album from New Gens will be all brand new material.

How do you think ‘Generally Speaking’ was received?

I think that album is timeless. If you listen to it, you keep surprising yourself. It’s quite deep. It’s different, but looking back, at the time I thought it was really different from what we do. Now, I can see it fits in with what we do – it’s us and fits our sound.

After releasing ‘Generally Speaking’ you embarked on a huge tour supporting Dizzee, what was it like spitting for crowds that aren’t as ‘Grime-savvy’ as your usual audience?

We found them quite receptive man. The ravers we played out to were there for a good time so we played to that. We were surprised the youngsters got in ‘cos there’s a fair amount of swearing in the shows but they were easy to get involved, especially when me and Foots get them to go against each other like ‘This side make noise, that side make noise’ ‘where’s all the girls in here?’ ‘who’s got money?’ ‘who knows about Facebook, Twitter, C‘mon!’

Will the experiences you got performing live form the shape of the new album?

Definitely, that is the way we go about music at all times. Every piece of music we write is something we can go and perform. It’s lively, always about making straight bangers. A lot of Grime artists do what they think will work but going to Dizzee’s show, you can see it’s electric. It’s like a D’n’B rave. I wouldn’t want to go to a live show and hear some bloody R’n’B. I want everyone to go maaaaaad!

Both you and Footsie feature on ‘Bad Mind People’ one of the stand-out tracks from Jammer’s debut album, released this week. What was it like hooking up for that?

It’s always fun hooking up with Jammer, we have bare jokes – Jammer’s a mad man! It was vibes recording that tune, Likkle J had already laid down his chorus so it was just us man vybzin, big up Jammer! We’ve known each other since 2000, I was the one that introduced Jammer to Nasty Crew, he was coming up on the production tip and then one day I went over to his house with Sharky and then it formed in front of me.

Do you still keep in contact with the other Nasty members?

Erm, not really. I don’t see Sharky much anymore. I still see Mak 10, Kano and Ghetts every so often but that’s it. I haven’t seen Stormin or Armour for a while…One person I do see come to think of it is Hyper. When he heard my ‘Woooo Riddim’ he phoned me up and was like ‘Double man I heard your Woooo. I need that beat!’ and he met me and got the beat. I told him that he better go mad on it and I tuned into Logan’s show to hear that he did…I think it might be the second best version man.

There is a lot of promo for ‘Bluku Bluku’ at the moment, what can people expect after it drops?

Once the release is done, we’ll get promoting that and then get ready for the ‘Bag of Greeze E.P.’, the second Newham General album and then pick up on my solo project that’s already in the making. We’ve got quite a few things on the go that should take us nicely into the new year.

Shouts?

Watch out for the ‘Street Fighter’ single released July 26th, the ‘Bluku Bluku E.P.’, the ‘Bag of Greeze E.P.’ and also watch out for ‘Bluku Bluku T.V’ coming soon to Dirtee Stank TV. I’ll be hosting the show, doing a load of stuff. We’re talking pranks, the whole shebang. There will be a few Punks in there, and hopefully we’ll be on BBC4 by the year 2012!

‘Street Fighter Riddim’ drops July 26th

Follow D Double on Twitter here

Kristian

Logan Sama’s June 2010 Round Up

July 6, 2010

“The last month has been all about the releases, and keeping them consistent. I helped J Beatz put out the ‘1 Dutty E.P’ on his own label Crown Jules and Sharky Major’s much-anticipated mixtape ‘Major League’ is coming out later this month. B-Live’s ‘Modern Warfare’ EP is coming after those, then we have two producer E.P.’s from NuKlea and Z-Dot and then Scrufizzer should also have an E.P. ready by then too, something I am particularly looking forward to hearing.

“All these guys have been sending me stuff regularly so it’s only right that their work is put out there for the public to buy. Putting downloads and promos on Twitter or Grime Forum is all well and good but for the casual listener, these are inaccessible. They will go on iTunes or Juno and search for music and so it’s important for artists to put their promos on these sites – it’s free to list as well.

“I’ve got a bag of unconfirmed projects in the pipeline too, one of which is called ‘Year of the Producer’ – a four track E.P. compiled with efforts from some of the bigger producers in the scene. Keep an ear out for that!

“I’m currently sourcing MC’s for the next Chosen Ones, due to air at the end of July or the start of August. Everyone’s schedule is hectic though as it’s summer – which only means one thing – Napa! However, the feedback I get for the shows is great and I really enjoy doing them.

“Already we’ve had some big releases, Skepta’s ‘Rescue Me’ and Jammer’s debut album ‘Jahmanji.’ A song from the album called ‘Back to the 90’s’ will, I think, do really well – the response from the crowd at the launch party was really good. In fact I think he will be performing a lot of songs from this one; it’s a varied album with lots of different styles and approaches.

“Touring with Mumdance and working with Toddla T has inspired Jammer to make a lot of uptempo dance-records – but not of the Euro-trance-pop variety! It’s an album you’d expect from a producer – with lots of Grime on it. ‘Bad Mind People’ featuring the New Gens and Lickle Jay is my personal pick!

Ghetts

“Ghetts’ appearance on my show this week was great and although we only got to play a handful of tracks from ‘Calm Before the Storm’, I’m excited to see how it is received by fans. Believe me when I say there are a LOT of good Grime tracks on there! Fans will be pleased.

“Talking of NASTY crew members, Hyper made a welcome return to Grime last week with his ‘Woooo Riddim’ version. Although I retired this beat a while back, it was good to hear him back. I know he’s got more in the pipeline too. People expressed their surprise at how sharp he sounded – what do you expect from a guy that’s done it as long as him!

“Aside from music, I recently purchased an iPhone. I’m learning it currently and will be able to Ustream etc in the near future. I have also bought a new HD camera, so expect to see more video features from myself soon! Oh and if you can’t wait, look out for me in the ‘Street Fighter Riddim’ video.

Respect. Keep it Grimy!

Logan.”

Logan’s Top 5 – July 2010

Jammer feat. Lickle Jay & Newham Generals – Bad Mind People

Maxsta feat. Various – East London Is Back RMX

Ghetts – Salute Me

D Double E – Street Fighter Riddim –

B-Live feat. Spyda, Newham Generals & Skepta – Modern Warfare 2

The 24 Days of Christmas – Day 21

December 21, 2009

As we all know, Christmas is fast approaching and as we all also know, many of you will be struggling to think of interesting gift ideas for your nearest and dearest. ‘What shall we buy to show our love?!’ we hear you cry. Well, fear not, for we at the Fold know that sometimes, thinking beyond the usual DVD boxsets/smellies/Xbox games can be a little difficult, and so over the course of December we endeavour to bring you a new gift idea each day on the run-up to Christmas, totalling 24, and with each one we shall also bring you an accompanying song that somehow represents the gift in some way. ‘Gift ideas and related entertainment?!’ we hear you now crying! ‘How on Earth do they manage it?!’

Day #21 – Chivas Regal whiskey

chivas

12 years of nurture go into this big beauty of a beverage. That may not sound like much by scotch standards; do not be fooled. I’m sure 4.5 litres later you’ll have your old man whimpering into your arm till the new year, heavily intoxicated and overly reminiscenct. This is the perfect gentleman’s gift, a gift to calm the nerves, warm the soul and hibernate indefinitely. The bottle is too big to be poured, so a cradle is provided to help ease the task. A task which becomes more taxing as the old man transforms into a gibbering mess who decided that 3 litres just wasn’t cutting it.

Orders can be made here

Buy out the bar and done. Simple’s, as the smug rodent Borat would say.

Dré

Sinogrime

December 18, 2009

Snow pressed into pavements…Silhouetted trees Sugar-frosted railings and fences…Oil rainbows on slushy roads…People shuffling to work buried in scarves and thick coats…Commuter trains creaking toward the capital…Sinogrime in the headphones.

If ever there was a perfect time for listening to Sinogrime, then this morning was it. Now if you have never heard that term before, you’re not the only one. I wasn’t familiar with it until I read this excellent blog by Dan Hancox. In it, Dan defines Sinogrime as a subgenre consisting mainly of 2002-3 productions by key Grime players such as Jammer, Terror Danjah and Wiley. These well-known instrumentals had stark, plucked melodies, skittish drums and brash basslines, evocative of the Far East.

Just as RZA had sculpted the Wu Tang sound from Kung-Fu soundtrack samples, the aforementioned beat makers hacked away at Zen meditation CD’s and film scores in search for similarly cold, deadpan riddim. Not only did Sinogrime, as Hancox eloquently put it, refract the “millennial promise of a new superpower”, but more-importantly I think, it aligned a burgeoning British urban genre with Wu Tang’s already infamous sound and revolutionary ethos.

Wu Tang forever changed Hip Hop with their lo-fi ASR-10 drum kits and brutal, street-based lyricism that manifested the social and economic constraints they faced. Their music was a cold, emotionless threat that snatched attention from the West Coast and brought it back to New York City’s projects. In the New York City metropolis, G-Funk didn’t translate – it’s warm, bass-heavy sonics were made for Cadillac’s and parties, not the tinny headphones of a street-based Brooklynite or a boom box in the Bronx.

Arguably, a similar parallel can be drawn between Garage and Grime. Sinogrime, however fleeting as a subgenre, made a similar statement of intent. It said the bubbly raves were over. All that was left was the cold reality of Blair’s Britain. Framed within the communist bleakness of the Orient, the mournful brass melody of Jammer’s ‘Thug’ (the first beat on Kode9’s mix below) rings out like a funeral march – not only for those living in barren council estates across Bow and the like, but for Garage music itself. Broadcast over tinny pirate radio frequencies, beats like this were a kind of death toll to good times past.

Even though the Grime sound has since moved on, those same Sinogrime principles exist today. As we face another year of discontent, I suggest Grime music curb its flirtation with other genres and tap into these deadening sounds once again. Not only would it offer new, expressive and musical ideas from within, bolstering Grime’s own artistic nuances, the results would also prove fitting for Winter settings like those outside today.

Kode9’s Sinogrime mix for Dan Hancox & Lower End Spasm Blog here.

Kristian

Boy Better Know – We’re Goin’ In

November 3, 2009

Bit late I know, but I had to blog about it. Good look for BBK – a good example of genre-disregarding music. Unsure of the vocoder, but the blended verse at the end is a really good idea, and Jammer is hilarious! When Donatella asks Skepta ‘Where can you see this being played?’ during this Grime Daily interview, and he stumbles for an answer, I couldn’t help but laugh.

I feel Grime fans pay too much attention to these sort of things. Instead of listening to a piece of music and making a judgement based on the emotional response the piece does, or doesn’t provoke, many base it on marketplace, situation, BPM, image or genre. This has to stop.

Shank bars and productions with no commercial appeal does not equal integrity. Shank bars are so widespread they should be viewed as spuriously as 8-bar loverman chats. Just because they don’t make any money doesn’t make them any more authentic or expressive.

I welcome this new direction for BBK. Vibes. Vibes. Vibes. And I know for sure, that there are more tracks like this on their way.

Kristian.