Posts Tagged ‘film’

Lights, Camera, AÇÃO!

July 29, 2010

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During the making of ‘O Divino, De Repente’ (2009)

Brazilian cinema, as an artform, is known for experiencing large fluctuations in terms of frequency of releases, due to the industry’s reliance upon the State for funding and incentives.

Despite this, the country has been responsible for some incredibly evocative and moving content over the past few years. Several key films have done much to lift the profile of Brazilian cinema overseas, showing the world an urban lifestyle far removed from the glamorous beaches of Ipanema and Copacabana.

In the 1940’s American genre films were very popular and many Brazilian production companies began to emulate them. The Cinematográfica Vera Cruz was one of the most prolific; established in 1949, Vera Cruz cinema represented the highly commercialized content that was beginning to characterize mainstream Brazilian cinema. Significant investment was made to these production houses, leading to large scale Hollywood-style studios that many felt produced films with high budgets but low on content.

As a result, many film-makers began to feel disillusioned and started experimenting with independent cinema. In the 50’s and 60’s a group of Brazilian directors began to practice a particular style and technique of film-making which became known as Cinema Novo.

Characterised by the Portuguese phrase ‘Uma câmera na mão e uma idéia na cabeça’, or ‘A camera in the hand and an idea in the head’, Cinema Novo was a retort, inspired by Italian Neo-Realism and French ‘Nouvelle Vague’ movements, against the output of the Vera Cruz, and aimed to authentically represent Brazilian life. Even today, with Brazil’s rise as a global economic power, the distribution of wealth is tremendously unbalanced; rich playboys party in the clubs of Rio de Janeiro while slums filled with the poor cover the hills overlooking the city.

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Cinema Novo addressed this by using Brazilian poverty as a main focus of the story-telling; a focus which, although the movement ended in the early 1970’s as a result of political oppression, can still be seen in contemporary works such as Carandiru (2003) and the Academy Award-nominated City of God (2002).

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Scenes from City of God (2002)

Brazil’s varied and engaging artistic output means that the country is constantly recognised as being a unique and rich cultural hub; for example, New York’s Museum of Modern Art, (MoMA), held a film exhibition between 15-29 July entitled ‘Premiere Brazil!’

Held every year in conjunction with the Rio de Janeiro International Film Festival, the event provides a platform for both new and established Brazilian film-makers to have a chance to premiere their works to American audiences.

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An image from Waste Land (2010) Directed by Lucy Walker. Image courtesy of moma.org

Over on the West Coast, the Los Angeles Brazilian Film Festival (LABRFF) has just finished its third edition, running from 27th April – 2nd May. LABRFF aims to provide a link between Brazil and Hollywood, raising the profile of Brazilian film-makers in the industry and promoting their films to a wider audience.

February saw the 2nd annual Hollywood Brazilian Film Festival, held over three days in the heart of Hollywood. HBR FEST is, according to their website, ‘a non-profit organisation dedicated to promoting the cultural and commercial exchange between Hollywood and Brazil.’

Much like LABRFF, the aim of the festival is to raise the profile of Brazilian filmmakers in Hollywood and elicit production and financing opportunities for international filmmakers; the first edition of the show in 2009 was held at the Egyptian Theatre and Mann Chinese 6 Cinemas, and was reportedly a great success for those involved. A total of eight feature films, documentaries and shorts are all given an enviable platform from which to air, many of them premieres.

Such cultural exchanges are very important; with the majority of the world’s cinema emanating from Hollywood it would be very easy for content to become homogenised and repetitive. By bringing in influences from countries such as Brazil, the industry can be sure of plenty of inspiration from a variety of global cultural capitals.

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With a landscape such as this, it is little wonder that Rio de Janeiro has inspired generations of Brazilian film-makers

In London earlier this year, Nike Sportswear premiered the release of Cadência, a major new film documentary and exhibition by director Daren Bartlett at Shoreditch’s Rich Mix exhibition centre. According to a review in Don’t Panic magazine, “Cadência sets out to articulate the ambiguous essence of Rio de Janeiro’s symbolic identity through its people, passions and traditions by exploring the underground phenomena of traditional kite culture, the masquerade of Clovis and of course, football.”

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In addition, an exhibition inspired by the film took place across the road at Nike’s 1948 store, featuring large-scale visual and audio projections taken from the film, a selection of art stills by Jiwon Park and catering by Brazilian restaurant Raizes.

Elsewhere in London, the HSBC-sponsored ‘Festival Brazil’ at the Southbank Centre runs from 19th June – 5th September, and celebrates Brazilian heritage in a vibrant and dynamic way. Although the event does not specifically feature cinema, it is an incredible celebration of Brazilian culture, from food and dance to literature and art.

Brazilian culture is unique in that its inclusive nature makes it feel accessible by people all across the world; the energy, vibrancy and richness of picture-postcard beaches and festivals juxtaposes with the gritty romance of the Cinema Novo favelas, providing beauty for those of all tastes. Given the ‘A camera in the hand…’ philosophy that underpins independent Brazilian cinema, there are arguably fewer places in the world where you’d rather be holding a camera.

James

Bi Polar Reviews: Shutter Island

March 18, 2010

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There’s certainly a purpose to all this madness—though to discuss how the film achieves this would be giving the game away. Rest assured dear reader, there are no spoilers in this review.

This week’s Bi-Polar Review: Shutter Island

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Martin Scorsese is from the New Hollywood school of thought. A title given to aspiring directors in the sixties and seventies; the generation of “movie brats” who had grown up with the cinema, studied the visual image and begun breaking down the studio contrivances in a (then) predominantly conservative industry. A self confessed film nerd, able to pluck inspiration from films ranging from Italian neo-realism to (in Shutter Islands case) concrete Hitchcock thrillers. Scorsese’s films have always played homage to films of past, but have also been coupled with his trademark stamp of death and onanism.

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Scorsese’s latest effort Shutter Island is no different, offering a structured gothic noir exhumed from a more than capable novelist. Mr. Lehane’s work is merely a framework with which Scorsese could etch, sculpt and mould from a lifetime as a movie admirer and decades as an esteemed director and auteur.

No surprises who takes the lead this time round. Leonardo DiCaprio, collaborates with Scorsese for the third successive time. Bringing with him that understated Bostonian drawl in the shape of U.S. marshal Teddy Daniels, summoned to the Island after a patient mysteriously disappears in Jonathon Creek fashion. As DiCaprio and his partner (a suitably restrained Mark Ruffalo) make inquiries of the patients and staff, they’re flummoxed by the seemingly implausible escape of a woman evaporating from a secure cell with around the clock surveillance, and second by how a patient could leave an island that makes Alcatraz look like the Isle of Wight. All theories point to Sir Ben of Kingsley, both Jekyll and Hyde of the hospital, a shrink who treats the prisoners as patients rather than criminals, but seems to be hiding something from poor Teddy. For his part, DiCaprio brings his own share of personal baggage: Still plagued by harrowing visions of Dachau, and his wife’s death in an apartment fire.

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What starts off as crime procedural slowly transforms into psychological thriller, as more torrid conclusions arrive, the pressure and claustrophobic atmosphere gradually start to eat away at Daniels’ nerves. Scorsese relishes in his protagonists nightmarish dream sequences and flashbacks that engulf his situation while heavily clouding his judgment. Shutter Island may initially seem like a nervy genre piece à la Cape Fear, but I would contend it lends itself more to a Hitchcockian tale, a carnival show where it’s sometimes difficult to distinguish between the troubled and troublesome. Imagine walking into your neighbour’s house after there has been a less than cosy confrontation. You are unsure as to why the atmosphere in the room is so bloody tense, but if you had any sense – you wouldn’t bother asking.

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Teddy’s problems are never too much for Scorsese and DiCaprio to handle, who in their third collaboration in a row have developed a definite rhythm that is evident in every scene. It is almost effortless how Teddy’s anxieties begin to creep into our own, the director makes the most of this, by choosing claustrophobic close ups, moving the camera in a little too close for comfort so we can see and more poignantly feel the characters every last nuance. All in all, it won’t be a beloved film to most, inspiring more dissertations and smug berets than popcorn fanatics and box office receipts. While this may not bring many happy faces around conference tables in Hollywood, they should take comfort in the fact that Shutter Island has not only a clear sense of self and purpose, but demonstrates a director (and production team for that matter) on the top of their game. Put simply, this is Scorsese at its best and noir at its darkest.

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Part Two

If Shutter Island were a blog it would be a page dedicated to 9/11 ‘truthers’, awash with theories on Bush speeches and Dan Brown numerology, tales of secret establishments and handshakes. The kind of site that hosts stock gifs and secondary colour schemes – all-caps and Bill Hicks prophecies. Don’t trust The Man yeah?

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As soon as US marshal Teddy Daniels steps onto the docks of Shutter Island. We’re thrown into a world of storms, loonies, liquids, Sir Ben Kingsley and surprisingly lucid dreams. Oh yeah, there’s a musical score that would make the Queen Mary blush. Conspiracies arise in droves as a Nazi, a murderer, and some diabolical experiments are thrown into the mix – add a touch of British weather for good measure and you have yourselves one confused looking Teddy.

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Teddy’s running out of time, and for a while we don’t know exactly why. Once we do, Scorsese sets about wrapping things up a bit too fast, like a lecturer who spends two hours talking about student indulgence and apathy before realising he has ten minutes left to actually get to the point. This tendency to overindulge in Teddy’s mind state leaves us lingering in the mind of a clearly confused protagonist cocooned in his own anxieties and as such – confused and cocooned ourselves.

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At this point you are not quite sure whether it is you or Scorsese who are beginning to lose their marbles. Has DiCaprio stepped into a nightmarish noir thriller or a Scooby Doo episode? He’s not sure, we’re not sure, but Scorsese, the ever present conductor, quickly prepares for the next act – audience, I present to you – some rats!

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Running in at just under two and a half hours, there is a lot of food for thought for what is essentially a revitalised gothic B-movie. The narrative and pacing is completely at odds with the director’s presentation; disproportionate handling of both the technique and homage’s to the works of Hitchcock and Kubrick. When the secrets of Shutter Island are finally presented to the audience in such quick succession – you are with little time to digest. Imagine Paula Radcliffe running the first three legs of a 4×100 relay, she plods along in earnest bounds, gracious and dignified, while others piss past her (sorry, couldn’t resist). She isn’t going to be drawn into the sprint; she’s in it for the long haul after all. It’s taken two hours to get three hundred metres but she enjoyed the journey and for the most part, it was nice seeing her get through it. But wait, who is this on the horizon?

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‘Take ya Tena Lady Radders, Usain got this!’

Dré

Threefold Media Update – February 2010

February 4, 2010

Already we are two months into a promising 2010. Where does the time go? Is time perception something that changes during puberty because time couldn’t pass quickly enough back then! Now weeks flash past in the blink of an eyelid and I feel like a perpetually startled deer. Oh dear.

Anyway, I would like to apologise on behalf of the team for the lack of updates over the past month. Before we broke up for Christmas, Threefold Media sat down over a few cold ones and thrashed out the action plan for the New Year. Therefore, when we reconvened – fat and full of Quality Street – we diverted most of our energy and attention into kick starting our business plans off.

And I am happy to say, so far so good!

2010, I can safely say, is going to be a big year for us. From humble beginnings as a shared ‘concept’ between three friends to a sharp, professional creative agency, Threefold Media is growing stronger everyday – making contacts and steering projects in the process.

We continue to make moves in the Grime scene, a genre we are all huge fans of, and have a number of new media projects that we hope to start later in the year. Working with Dirtee Stank, Tim & Barry, Logan Sama, Butterz, No Hats No Hoods, MSM Studios and various MC’s, producers and DJ’s, we feel confident that we, and indeed Grime, will achieve new successes this year and that our shared cultural and financial capital will grow stronger.

To achieve this we will be stepping away from traditional Grime representations and stereotypes and promoting something fresh and original, that is still true to Grime’s roots, artists and fans. No more alleyways or paint splatters please! As a genre that’s often at the mercy of advertising companies and brands looking for a cheap way to ‘buy’ sub-cultural cool, we hope to demonstrate that Grime is a forward-thinking, innovative movement that deserves dignity and above all respect.

In fashion, another passion of ours, we have a number of projects and collaborations coming up, working specifically with young, fresh and talented designers and labels from both Southampton and London. In collaboration with Mpdclick Managing Editor Sarah Leigh, we are helping host a trend-setting fashion-themed event in March that will be the first of its kind in Southampton and promises to be a great success, building on the city’s growing reputation as a burgeoning cultural centre. More details on that soon!

The popularity of our interview with Logan Sama, as well as the growing demand for the visual medium, has led us to the conclusion that video is the way forward. Therefore we will be investing in video equipment this year – not only will this add further depth to our repertoire, but it will allow us to develop other avenues of creativity.

Having spent the past couple of years photographing and documenting our city, and working with a multitude of local council bodies, event staff and media outlets, I now have enough material to build my own exhibition. Scheduled for the latter half of the year, the exhibition will be called ‘Capturing Southampton’ and will feature Southampton citizens from all walks of life in their magnificent glory! As a passionate photojournalist, this is one project I am especially looking forward to!

As well as all this, we continue to photograph, design, write and publish work for clients looking for a new creative direction. We are releasing a PDF soon, profiling examples of our best work. If you would like a copy or simply talk further about our projects, message me on twitter (@threefoldmedia) or email me at Kristian at threefoldmedia dot co dot uk.

Here’s to a prosperous new year!

Regards,

Kristian on behalf of Threefold Media

No Hats No Hoods Showcase – January 2010

February 1, 2010

No Hats No Hoods showcase @ Tim & Barry’s studio, featuring P Money, Blacks, Royal T, Magic, DJ JJ, Rude Kid, Hammer and the Don’t Watch That team.

Big up to all those involved! Set soon come!

For photos contact me on twitter @threefoldmedia

Kristian

How To Train Your Dragon Trailer

December 30, 2009

DreamWorks has quietly debuted a second full-length trailer for their upcoming release, How to Train Your Dragon. DreamWorks clearly isn’t convinced that How to Train Your Dragon will sell on its own merits. Hence the elaborate intro with footage from all of their past movies. Hardly a strongest selling point but I was sold at Dragons anyway.

Heres the trailer:

Dré

Eminems Returns, Tooled Up…

November 9, 2009

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Worldwide, an army of peroxide has begun to gather; some murmur, others stare aimlessly, while the rest recite infamous bars in thick Scottish accents (yes I remember you). Finally Marshall appears; sat atop a mountain of metaphorical prescriptions. He announces that he will following up on the $116 million grossing biopic, 8 Mile, with a 3D horror simply entitled Shady Talez. The project had been stirring around for quite some time now, but will now be accompanied by a package that includes a limited edition four-issue comic book series due 2010 from Marvel Icons. The above image comes from the upcoming serial. Slim Shady will produce and star in multiple roles in the film, which will give an “urban wink” to genre classics such “as Christine, Aliens, and The Lost Boys“ in the style of George Romero’s Creepshow. Kevin Grevioux, who helped shape the Underworld franchise, will take script duties alongside Dallas Jackson.

A release date for the film is yet to be announced. In the meantime, here’s Em offering himself to The Punisher.

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Dré

Twitcritics

October 22, 2009

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In terms of influence, there have been numerous news stories crediting Twitter for generating strong buzz that is often reflected at the box office. We could debate all day if Twitter has any real sway at the box office. What is important to fans and advertisers alike however, is monitoring Twitter’s sample of real time moviegoers. The opinions they spread on Twitter could be seen as an accurate representation of the word of mouth spread in the real world – albeit a highly compact one.

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The new website Twitcritics would be worth keeping an eye on if you are a member of this twitterati. The website structure is similar to that of Metacritic and Rotten Tomatoes, but rather than compiling reviews from film critics. TwitCritics brings you real-time movie reviews and ratings directly from the Twiterverse (in their own words). Essentially, the site compiles a list of tweets by title, then tries to determine whether a tweet is positive or negative based on keywords used within the tweet. The idea is sounds great on paper, but the website is still in its beta stage and needs a few creases ironed out.

I think there is clearly value in a website like Twitcritic. People have always needed to study and contextualise real-time buzz and hearsay. As the program gets more complex, we were see how much value there really is in

Dré

Adventures In Analogue

October 10, 2009

Two disposable cameras. Here are my findings:


This guy was getting arrested.


The most 70’s building ever!

Kristian

We Should Have Listened!

October 7, 2009

I am almost certain Matt and Trey are behind this new disaster flick with a tag line like this. Oh wait, sorry – it’s bloody Roland!

Independence Day, Godzilla, The Day After Tomorrow and now 2012.

Okay Roland, you’ve covered:

Aliens
check!
Dinosaur’s
check!
Mother Nature
check!

erm, what about deadly Mayan calenders??

The prophet hath spoken; give him 300 million and seventy dollars!

Dré

Citizen Camera – Sabina House, Uganda

September 29, 2009

As media communication becomes ever more sophisticated and influential in the development of Western societies, the disparity between first and third worlds has never been starker. Economic wealth has divided the globe for centuries; solutions to solving debt and poverty mired by politics, colonialism, religion and corruption. However, there is no such reason as to why the technological gulf cannot be stemmed.

Post-based ‘Cash for Mobile’ schemes enable unused handsets to be reused in the third world. Why can’t the same principle be applied to computers, monitors, motherboards, mice, keyboards, digital cameras and wire? Without these parts and tools, any chance of real technological infrastructure being implemented in developing countries seems all the more unlikely. It’s a simple case of supply and demand.

To be able to create ‘meaning’ that can be quickly shared and duplicated across the globe (I.E. media products such as photography, film, art and writing) people of the third world have little chance of competing economically in the future.

Therefore, it warms my heart to see organisations like Winchester-based Citizen Camera going to Uganda and teaching children there photography and film-making methods. As the video below details, their brief, but ultimately beneficial workshops enable these Ugandan children – many of whom have never even touched a camera before – to create their own meaning, to tell their own story.

This short piece by the children of Sabina House, is an enriching watch. The material within is not completely alien to me, after all, I’ve seen comic relief appeals many times. However, it is refreshing to imbibe their world, their experiences and life without emotionally-charged charity messages blurring my understanding.

So as I sit here in Southampton, blogging on my Dell workstation, I can watch and appreciate Ugandan life through the eyes of the children who live there. I only hope for more initiatives like this.

Watch the Sabina House film here

Many thanks to Mr Karin Stowe.

Kristian