Posts Tagged ‘Dubstep’

Newham Generals – Like It or Not

September 27, 2010

Again, the Newham Generals smash it. ‘Like it or Not’ is the latest dubstep-infused tune to be released (in hood video format) from the forthcoming ‘Bag of Grease E.P.’ out on the 4th October. Produced by Skitz Beatz, Dee and Foots ride his rumbling basslines and epic stabs with deceptive ease, dropping lyrics fans may have first heard the duo spit on a recent DJ Cameo set.

Everyone hypes about this new generation coming through, and whilst there is definitely solid talent there, many can’t hold anything to the style, pattern and flair the Generals exhibit. Whilst there is an undeniably serious and violent undertone in most of their music, it is more often than not offset by a playful lyrical approach. If ever you see the New Gens perform live, there is always a smile or a tongue in cheek. Watch the below video to see what I mean.

It’s something I feel is lost on the younger generation of MC‘s who seemingly make it impossible to enjoy their music if you are in anything but an angry or aggressive mood. The hosting element is lost on them. Anyway, back to ‘Like it or Not’ – it’s a record that’s hard, danceable and unique to the UK. Big up Dee and Foots who relentlessly cook up new styles, sounds and patterns like it’s normal.

Good to see Kronik vybzing in the video too!

Kristian

Newham Generals – Bag Of Grease

September 8, 2010

Newham Generals are one of my all time favourite acts. Undisputed Grime legends, Footsie and DEE have honed their craft over a number of years, a journey which has taken them from pirate radio to sell out concerts and festival stages. They have set trends, blurred musical boundaries and are living proof that making Grime music with wide appeal is still possible.

All this despite only having one CD to their name. Well, that’s all about to change.

Newham Generals’ ‘Bag of Grease E.P.’ is soon to be released digitally and already it looks like it’s gonna be a stomper. Featuring five tracks (four of which have been produced by SKITZ Beatz), ‘Bag of Grease E.P.’ is short, sharp and to the point and will, judging by the samples, live up to its name in every single way. It’s special microsite leaves nothing to the imagination either!

The E.P. includes modern classic ‘I’m a General’ & the remix (featuring the late great Esco Bars), as well as ‘Like It Or Not’, a gritty Dubstep number that’s a nod to the Generals’ shakedowns at FWD>>. Out on October 4th, ‘Bag of Grease E.P.’ will breathe life back in the game. Or take it, depending on how you look at it.

Kristian

D Double E Interview

July 17, 2010

I caught up with D Double and the Dirtee Stank crew at the BBC as he was about to perform on the 5.19 show. After filming was done we went to the pub and, over a Bacardi and coke (double measures of course!) had a chat about Street Fighter, Newham Generals and the many upcoming projects he’s involved in. Bluku Bluku!

So, ‘Street Fighter Riddim’ is doing the rounds at the moment, Swerve produced it, are you two going to work together in future?

Yeah really want to do another tune with Swerve. Right now he’s got a lot of fire for me.

The collaboration seemed to come a little about out of the blue…

Yeah I’d never heard Swerve’s production – I never knew he produced until Laurence said ‘Ere listen mate, got a beat ‘ere’ and I was like ‘alright then let’s have a butchers.’ And yeah, I’m here! Big up Laurence, big up Swerve!

Have Capcom said anything? Do they want you on the next game?!
Yeah man, hopefully all that stuff will come after the tune. It’s in the pipeline, I mean we had to holla at them for the legalisation, so they know about us, but we re-did the sounds and FX anyway and I don’t think anyone can tell the difference! HADOUKEN! Hahaha!

After releasing your ‘Woooo Riddim’ version and ‘Street Fighter Riddim’, anticipation for the forthcoming DEE solo project is high. What can fans expect?

Boy, you can expect pure heat. If you liked the ‘Woooo Riddim’, ‘Street Fighter’ or ‘Hard’, then know what sort of avenue I’m taking.

Guest spots?

Producer-wise there is a couple of guest spots there. Footsie’s there, I’ve got a couple of tunes from Cage, Swerve, Swindle, Noah D and Skream. It’s an A-list roster…It’s gonna be live!

You produce as well as MC, can we expect any of your production efforts on there?

Definitely in the future, but at the moment I’m trying to pump out my vocals on the best beats and get my levels up in the background. Production is more of a hobby for me.

Part of the Newham Generals ‘Bag of Greeze E.P.’ is being produced by Skitz. What was it like working together?

Skitz has been about for time and he lives around the corner from my house so I’ve known him for a long time. Skitz is bless and used to work with Slew Dem a lot back in the day who are like my family.

The ‘I’m a General’ tune featuring the late Esco must have been a lot to record. Was it an emotional experience?

Erm…It was kind of, but at the same time it was a good feeling to promote and showcase his talent again. We wanted to show love. He never got his chance to shine so we helped out a bit.

I read an interview you gave with the Guardian back in 2004 where you said you were tired of listening to 14 year olds chat about guns, and that you wanted to go lyrically deeper with your music. What does Grime say to you today and do you feel able to express yourself fully on it?

Grime has got a lot lighter, it’s still dark, but it has definitely lightened up. Stations like KISS, 1Xtra and Radio 1 are starting to play us now so we all have to straighten out a bit. It’s getting more professional and the production is levelling as well.

Does Grime still give you the same feeling as it did back in the day?

Definitely man, I can listen to Grime beats all day. It still hits me and I like the way it’s getting wider. Tunes like ‘Rescue Me’ by Skepta [for example] aren’t strictly ‘Grime’, but they have that element. It has that home base. I like anything that has that home base in there.

Talking of success, Chipmunk, Tinchy and Tinie are finding high chart positions, and Jammer, Skepta and yourself are starting to position yourselves for the same. However, whereas they made their music a bit sweeter, you guys have been able to stay true to your sound and still find new audiences. Did they ‘open the doors’ for you in that sense?

I think they have made it easier, but not because of what they’ve done. People are moving away from the scene, so the people like me left at the core are able to represent more fully. They aren’t repping what we come from. You hear a mixtape and there might be a couple of hard tracks on there, but their core fans don’t get Grime.

They are helping in the way that, if they have an interview they will talk about what they’ve done before and who we are.

You have been noted as being ahead of your time, and you’ve said that you still perform lyrics still you wrote at 15. What lyrics were they?

Err…yeah, you know “If you you, you you/ Wanna come against I-I, I-I” that was from then, “me nah ramp, me nah skin/” Ah there’s so many, I’ve got a big selection of lyrics.

Your lyric repertoire is big, but how do you keep going on sets?

It’s natural for me. I don’t really need to make that much of an effort to lift-off as I used to. It’s just there bruv. I could be here mucking about and say something and I could make it into the deepest thing.

Has that happened recently?

Yeah man, it happened with ‘Hard.’ We put that together quickly! ‘Street Fighter’ was so quick, all I need to do is feel free, have the beat playing and bubble.

How would you say you’ve developed since the Jungle days?

I’ve got more professional with the lyrics. On Jungle I couldn’t really go into depth ‘cos of the tempo, Hip Hop was a bit too slow and Grime was just right. I found I could go in more. Now I can spit at 140 (bpm), 160, whatever.

You and Footsie together with DJ Tubby have forged a niche spitting over Dubstep, and have become known for it. Is it more exciting to spit over than regular Grime?

I prefer to ride Grime because it gives me the time to do what I need to – maybe a bit too much time sometimes! You know, if a DJ’s playing for two hours it’s like ‘Rah I might run out of power’ on dubstep though, there are tunes there that you can’t ride, they’re too big. You’re still ready to leng, but you’re also a host.

With Grime it’s flat out. You can spit your heart out for half an hour with hype and then the tune you love best comes in and you’re like ‘shit!’ So yeah, I think Grime is better to practice and MC to.

What do you think about other MC’s jumping on it?

It’s alright, it’s a good move but I think Dubstep is slightly different. You can’t really do too many deep songs on it; the instrumentals have as much power as the vocals. With the beat already there, as an MC you need only add a couple of spicy lines and it’s gone, maxed out. With Grime you have to add your own energy and build on the beat.

Some people sound good on it, some don’t.

As a FWD>> veteran, what has performing there done for your repertoire?

FWD>> was my introduction to Dubstep. Tubby and Footsie brought me in on that, I was all Grime-d out, whereas they were into their Dub. But FWD>> was a time where I got to see another world and build on it. Now, Dubstep is massive and it’s cool man.

You’ve worked with Breakage and Skream, are there any other people you would like to work with?

Yeah, I’m working with Noah D, I want to do a tune with Chromestar, Caspa, Plastician…anyone that has the bangers. They know what I can do!

Let’s talk about ‘Generally Speaking.’ I heard you spit on DJ MK’s kiss show and you said ‘Generally Speaking means a lot to me.’ What does that CD mean to you?

It’s a benchmark. It was the first official release and there will be a lot more to come. That was number one…

What was the recording process like?

It was long – over quite a stretch of time. Some of the tunes that were on the finalised track listing were some of the last ones we recorded. We had so many to consider, it was like a puzzle trying to fit it all together.

Will any of the off cuts make it onto the new CD?

Nah man, that’ll all be fresh stuff. We got some tunes that we’ll pump out in the meantime but the next album from New Gens will be all brand new material.

How do you think ‘Generally Speaking’ was received?

I think that album is timeless. If you listen to it, you keep surprising yourself. It’s quite deep. It’s different, but looking back, at the time I thought it was really different from what we do. Now, I can see it fits in with what we do – it’s us and fits our sound.

After releasing ‘Generally Speaking’ you embarked on a huge tour supporting Dizzee, what was it like spitting for crowds that aren’t as ‘Grime-savvy’ as your usual audience?

We found them quite receptive man. The ravers we played out to were there for a good time so we played to that. We were surprised the youngsters got in ‘cos there’s a fair amount of swearing in the shows but they were easy to get involved, especially when me and Foots get them to go against each other like ‘This side make noise, that side make noise’ ‘where’s all the girls in here?’ ‘who’s got money?’ ‘who knows about Facebook, Twitter, C‘mon!’

Will the experiences you got performing live form the shape of the new album?

Definitely, that is the way we go about music at all times. Every piece of music we write is something we can go and perform. It’s lively, always about making straight bangers. A lot of Grime artists do what they think will work but going to Dizzee’s show, you can see it’s electric. It’s like a D’n’B rave. I wouldn’t want to go to a live show and hear some bloody R’n’B. I want everyone to go maaaaaad!

Both you and Footsie feature on ‘Bad Mind People’ one of the stand-out tracks from Jammer’s debut album, released this week. What was it like hooking up for that?

It’s always fun hooking up with Jammer, we have bare jokes – Jammer’s a mad man! It was vibes recording that tune, Likkle J had already laid down his chorus so it was just us man vybzin, big up Jammer! We’ve known each other since 2000, I was the one that introduced Jammer to Nasty Crew, he was coming up on the production tip and then one day I went over to his house with Sharky and then it formed in front of me.

Do you still keep in contact with the other Nasty members?

Erm, not really. I don’t see Sharky much anymore. I still see Mak 10, Kano and Ghetts every so often but that’s it. I haven’t seen Stormin or Armour for a while…One person I do see come to think of it is Hyper. When he heard my ‘Woooo Riddim’ he phoned me up and was like ‘Double man I heard your Woooo. I need that beat!’ and he met me and got the beat. I told him that he better go mad on it and I tuned into Logan’s show to hear that he did…I think it might be the second best version man.

There is a lot of promo for ‘Bluku Bluku’ at the moment, what can people expect after it drops?

Once the release is done, we’ll get promoting that and then get ready for the ‘Bag of Greeze E.P.’, the second Newham General album and then pick up on my solo project that’s already in the making. We’ve got quite a few things on the go that should take us nicely into the new year.

Shouts?

Watch out for the ‘Street Fighter’ single released July 26th, the ‘Bluku Bluku E.P.’, the ‘Bag of Greeze E.P.’ and also watch out for ‘Bluku Bluku T.V’ coming soon to Dirtee Stank TV. I’ll be hosting the show, doing a load of stuff. We’re talking pranks, the whole shebang. There will be a few Punks in there, and hopefully we’ll be on BBC4 by the year 2012!

‘Street Fighter Riddim’ drops July 26th

Follow D Double on Twitter here

Kristian

Logan Sama’s May 2010 Round Up

June 10, 2010

Apologies for the late blog entry. As some of you will know I was booked to play San Francisco at the end of May, which kind of messed up my schedule. However I’m back now, well rested and ready to go!

Flyer

Starting with my trip, San Francisco was cool! In terms of the actual gigs – they went ok. Dubstep has been big for a while out there, but I was the first dedicated Grime DJ to have been booked. The gigs could have been a bit busier, but amongst those that were in attendance there were some really knowledgeable people who enjoyed the tunes and knew the records.

There were some Dubstep guys on the rota and so when they played it was very much a ‘let’s stand here and absorb the Dubstep’ atmosphere. In fact, whilst I was there, ‘The One’ said he noticed his audiences being turned off by the shrill, mid-range ‘Brostep’ that currently popular. Because ‘The One’ and his lot are so in touch with the music, they only book Dubstep acts like Joe Nice and Mala – DJ’s that still incorporate the ‘Dub’ element in their sets. However, when I went in, people were jumping up and down and showing real energy. Surprisingly, they went for the vocals as much as the beats. I think after hearing instrumentals all night they needed something different to vibe to!

I’ve got to big up the promoter ‘The One’ for bringing me out to San Fran. He DJ’s and produces Grime, often collaborating with others in the area. He actually did a remix of Wiley’s beat ‘5.27’ which I played on my show about a year and a half/two years ago. There are guys out there that have been doing Grime for a good 5-6 years, who know all the tunes and are up to date with releases…With the internet, anywhere you go in the world, fans that know the music will talk to you and know as much as anyone in the UK. It’s good to see.

In fact, whilst I was out there I was made aware of a couple of MC’s bringing the Bay Area style of rapping to Grime. One is called Skurge, a talented spitter that ‘The One’ is working with. Also, there is a production crew called ManVSMachine that are doing stuff over Terror Danjah beats etc. I know Tre Mission is big now and spits double time Grime tempos, but these guys bringing a slower, drawn-out style to the table.

Logan's Sweets

Music aside, I enjoyed the American food as subscribers to my Twitter feed will know! I always think of picking up my phone when I’m about to eat…so naturally I feel to broadcast my eats worldwide! I was only there for five days and I wanted to try everything so I went to the International House of Pancakes and had a stack, had a Philly cheese steak and a couple of burgers. It was ok for a week, but if I stayed out there any longer I would’ve probably had a coronary!

Back in the UK it’s been pleasing to see so many instrumental tracks/CD’s coming out. Fans can get their hands on a lot more beats that would’ve otherwise become obscurities. I think now that this is going, we need to keep momentum behind the E.P. and single release model that JME and myself have been using. There is no reason why producers, after getting good feedback for a track, can’t fling it up on iTunes so that it comes out a couple months after audiences have first heard it. Also, this open-source remix thing going on at the moment, spearheaded by Terror Danjah, Skepta, JME etc is very healthy for the scene and is a really good platform for established producers to show the levels. I’ll be showcasing more of the efforts on my show soon, do a little medley or something.

NHNT

Despite only catching a couple of the episodes, BBC2’s No Hats No Trainers has become a great vehicle for Grime culture. If the culture gets out there, then the sound will follow. Whilst I’m under no illusion that if we were to put out Next Hype tomorrow it would make top 10, the more people who are made familiar with Grime culture the more accepting they will be of the music. Then, there will be less need for these 4/4-electro crossover efforts. You have to remember that the guys responsible for picking the track listings for Radio 1 etc, are middle-aged, middle-class men who are out of touch and incapable of spotting trends. They only pick what is popular now.

Anything that makes Grime look a little more desirable to the masses is great in my book. They said they’d get me on there sometime soon, although I haven’t heard anything yet. The Street Fighter section with D Double was something that I’d have liked to have got in on…Seeing as I was one of the first to play the tune AND I spend most of my day playing Street Fighter!

The World Cup is about to start and whilst I hope England romp home to an astonishing victory (!), I also hope there won’t be any major incidents. Having lived out in South Africa for three years, I know how beautiful friendly and welcoming the country can be. Conversely, I also know how dangerous it is in certain parts. It has one of the highest murder rates in the world and poverty remains a massive issue. So if you are going, enjoy yourself, soak up the atmosphere but be vigilant – not just of crime but the weather. It’s Winter out there right now so it’s as warm as London in the Summer during the day but at night, temperatures plummet.

As for predictions, I haven’t seen any teams that are really playing on form but aside from Brazil, I reckon the Spaniards will do well.

Until next time peeps, Keep It Grimy!

Logan

No Hats No Hoods Showcase – January 2010

February 1, 2010

No Hats No Hoods showcase @ Tim & Barry’s studio, featuring P Money, Blacks, Royal T, Magic, DJ JJ, Rude Kid, Hammer and the Don’t Watch That team.

Big up to all those involved! Set soon come!

For photos contact me on twitter @threefoldmedia

Kristian

Joker – Why Don’t You Like Me? (£10 Bag Mix)

October 16, 2009

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Joker is a Bristol-based producer and DJ who is responsible for ‘Purple Wow’ – his own psychedelic, electronic sound that’s heavily reliant on synths, bass and squiggly rhythms. His productions are treasured by Grime and Dubstep fans alike and whilst his sound is hard and uncompromising, his soaring, fuzzy notations bring that feminine, danceable element back into the mix.

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Here, £10 Bag has very kindly produced a 30-min mix of Joker productions for your listening pleasure. Featuring some of Jokers’ landmark pieces, £10 Bag’s mixing is seamless. So, download, plug in and soak up the electronics. Joker should have a computer racing game styled around this music – something like Wipeout, only a bit more retro and with lots and lots of neon purple!

Download here (Right-click, Save As…)

Check out Dan Hancox’ piece on Joker here.

Kristian

BBK’s Set @ Matter

October 14, 2009

D Double @ Rinse 15th Birthday, Matter

D Double @ Rinse 15th Birthday, Matter

In case you havent already heard, Rinse have released an MP3 recording of Boy Better Know’s set from their 15th birthday celebrations @ Matter.

Get that here.

For those that were there, this is a most welcome gift, and helps fill in those gaps you missed whilst going absolutely bonkers! On listening back, there were rather a lot of wheel-ups. It’s almost annoying to listen to in the cold light of day. However, as Maximum cleared up on Grimeforum:


However, for those that missed it, don’t fret as Rinse have booked out Matter again on 20th November.

Details here.

Enjoy!

Kristian

Martin Clark (Blackdown) Appreciation

October 2, 2009

Martin Clark is one of this country’s most underrated music journalists. He has written for The Guardian, Jockey Slut and Pitchfork Media, and has almost single-handedly intellectualised the Dubstep scene by writing in depth about its rhythms, production techniques and style patterns.

As half of Dubstep production outfit Dusk & Blackdown and resident DJ on underground staple Rinse FM, Clark has a unique and participatory insight into his subject matter. His blog, Blackdown Soundboy is packed with quality articles, interviews and insights from the Dubstep, Grime and Funky scenes – a ‘must favourite’ for any self-respecting fan of the aforementioned genres. Recent highlights include an extensive interview with the bastion of Funky, Marcus Nasty and an interesting piece on Funky re-fixes of garage classics.

Here though, is an abridged version of a candid interview he conducted with Wiley way back in 2003, which can be found in full here. It’s an absolute favourite of mine; frank, charming and to the point…Which is Clark all over.

Enjoy.

Wiley is the biggest MC in East London. In any bit of London for that matter. He’s the man who brought Dizzee Rascal and his Roll Deep Entourage through, who re-invented garage with a hip hop twist via his “Eskimo” and the “Ice Rink” riddims. The man who added the Orient and took away the beats with “devil mixes.” The man of many lyrical beefs. The man with the string-lead, glacial, riddim-not-track musical vision. On the release of “Ground Zero,” one of his very strongest riddims to date, Hyperdub caught up with Wiley …

Martin Clark: How did Eski Dance come about?

Wiley: One day I just wanted to do a rave innit? I thought of the name and went to Mix It Up promotions and did it with them. We had the first, the second, the third and it’s going well. We’re on our fifth one now. We just tried to get all the people in the scene under one roof.

M: And what is that scene?

W: Some people call it grime, grimey or whatever it’s called. But I call my sound “eski beat.” That’s what I call it and everyone else can call their sound whatever they want. So people who make similar music to me, it will go under that anyway.

M: So who else is on your wavelength?

W: Very few. Dizzee. Jammer, Kano from NASTY. TNT. There’s a couple of people who see the vision. There’s many more but they’re the ones I see on a regular basis. Danny Weed, Target, Louie White and Bigga too.

M: So is it a new UK form of hip hop?

W: Yeah it is but it hasn’t been called that yet. But it is very similar because everyone writes their beats, everyone writes their songs, it’s rapping but English. That’s the only difference. People are just talking about their lives.

The other side of it is the MCs. Some MCs are big but they can’t write songs. They haven’t made the conversion from MC to artist. That’s why some of them are still just MCs. Once you make the conversion and start writing about your feelings and all things like that you make it real for yourself. You gotta make the conversion.

M: Tell me about the sounds that you use…

W: Yeah I’ve got a few more plug-ins now. But I use whatever my ear catches innit. I flick through and then play whatever I want to play with it. I’ll play melodies. A lot of people don’t think I make my tunes but I’ve made everything. I have done tunes where I didn’t engineer but whatever happens I always play what I want in. That’s why I call myself a producer. I mix it all down and do it all myself right now. I’m just trying to press on and get further and further in my career.

M: Why do you use sounds that no one else would use?

W: Exactly, exactly: sounds people would think that’re weak, or that’s anything. But I just hear things. I play it and it just forms together innit. It’s like a gift you know that? When I sit down I don’t copy nothing, as such. I don’t try and base my music around anything. Ideas just come in my head and I play them.

M: There’s a big Oriental feeling to them…

W: I used to watch a lot of Kung Fu films. I just like the idea of the Oriental thing. I started that idea, then I stopped it and then went back to it. It just something I like. I like Chinese music. I like Greek music. I’ve been buying loads of kinds of music: Greek, Chinese, African. I just went to some place called Sterns? It sells world music and I bought loads of stuff there. I’ll take it back and sometimes I’ll sample it, sometimes loop it, or take parts and put them in different places. I do all different bits to try and get the finished thing.

M: That’s strange to hear you’re sampling because a lot of your tunes have sounded distinctive and related because the strings seem to come from a similar source or module…

W: I like orchestras innit. I listen to a lot of that. If I flick through a module and hear anything orchestral I might go in that direction. Though on another day I might go in another Oriental direction. I go in different directions every time I start.

M: So how did the idea for the two Ice Rink vocal 12″s come about?

W: What it was that I made that thing quickly and vocalled it myself. It’s going to be on my album – I’ve got a song on it. One day I decided to let other people do versions to get their names big. There’s loads of different ones – I only put out those two vinyl – but I’ve got all the best MCs on it. If it becomes a single for my album I’ll put them out. There’s a version by Flirta D, he’s done a good one. He’s been around for ages but he’s here now, noticed now.

I like him, he’s one of my favourites. Kano, he’s one of my favourites. Crazy Titch, his one didn’t come out. There will probably be two more parts before I bring out the CD. Plus I’ve got the “War.” I’ve got loads of mix CDs. Once called “Creeper Vol 1” coming out soon. Tinchy Stryder, he’s got one called “The Takeover”. Roll Deep Regular CD we’re doing. All three of them will be done very soon. On Creeper it’s little snippets of some tunes from my album and other stuff, freestyles. Tinchy’s is the same. Roll Deep’s is the whole Roll Deep Crew, everyone, working together to get the Roll Deep vibe going again.

M: That’s the funniest thing, because your 12″s are the biggest on road, but no one’s got them on dub…

W: They’re about. I’ve even got a back catalogue of stuff that never came out. or it came out and it wasn’t mixed down properly. But it’s gonna carry on, it’s not gonna stop.

M: How did the idea for the beatless “devil mixes” come about?

W: Nah it’s not “devil mix” you know? I called it that because it sounded evil to me innit. But I don’t call it “devil mix” anymore because when I started calling it that I started to get lots of bad luck, if you understand. I called it that because it sounded evil but really, why didn’t I call it “god mix” then? Because I don’t believe in the devil. The more and the more you say his name, believe it or not, he’ll come closer to you. And that is the truth, I swear I am not joking. “Bass mix” I call them now, cos it’s just bass. The devil mix brought me too much luck. I was selling the devil mix of Eskimo and they were selling so fast. I bought stuff with the money, bought a car and crashed it. So it just turned me off.

M: It’s an obvious thing to do – take the beats out of the tune – but in practice no one dares to do it. Why did you just go “fuck it?”

W: Cos I just did. I like bass innit. Obviously my dad used to be on a soundsystem, it used to be all about bass. You used to get parts of the tune that were all dubbed out. Just bass running and then the beat coming back in. So the ideas were all there but I decided to just take the beats out and just leave it and MC on it and it worked.

M: Who’s on the Eskimo vocal mix?

W: It’s being done now, but we did have one already but I’ve re-done it because it had some different people on it. I just wanted to keep it straight cos it had a bit here, and then another bit there.

M: Is like that the amazing “Eskimo (Chubby Dread vocal special)” with you, Dizzee and more?

W: Exactly. That was a special but people started to like that. I was going to do it like that but then I changed my mind, because it’s so old I didn’t want to do it. My single is going to be “What Do You Call It” which is on the “Igloo” rhythm. I done it ages ago, before “War.” It goes “what do you call it?/garage?/what do you call it?/urban? 2step?”

It’s explaining about how we started doing garage and then they started turning their back to us. Pushing us away, trying to say we’re ruining the scene and all that.

M: Who’s “they?”

W: A few people, they know who they are.

M: Media people or garage industry people?

W: A few people in the industry, the big people in garage, they were blaming the sound because they think it makes people fight or get shot. Whatever they thought, they tried to associate it with that. But we’ve had four Eskimo Dances and no one’s died or nothing. That proves it weren’t nothing to do with me. We’ve moved on and they can’t say it’s anything to do with me because all I do I MC and do the music. If someone’s got a feud with someone and they want to shoot them then that is going to happen with or without us.

M: So when you’re MCing, whatever lyrics you say, it makes no difference?

W: Erm not really. What I say – I can’t talk for everyone else, I say what I say – I don’t actually go out there and say “Oh yeah, hello, I’m going to shoot you with a gun… I’m this… I’m that.” That’s not really me. I just go up there and say lyrics. My lyrics aren’t really like that, so they can’t associate me with it.

M: What was Dizzee like when you first me him?

W: He was like just a little boy from the area. He was like energy, raring to go. He put something back into me that I never had in me at the time. I wasn’t converted to an artist, that’s one thing. And I was just an MC. Listening to him made me convert to an artist, it made me open up my mind that it’s not just about garage. It’s music, just make music. Before that I didn’t have it in me, but I got energy from him. When he was growing up listening to me it was vice versa.

Interview by Martin Clark on 23/10/03
This is the transcript of an interview for Jockey Slut magazine.

Kristian

FWD VS Rinse @ Matter O2 Nov 20th

September 25, 2009

Good news! Rinse has secured a quarterly residency at the London superclub. After the success of Rinse’s 15th birthday event there it seems like a natural decision. This one look set to be every bit as special as the last!

Absolutely mental line up:

SKREAM + BENGA 2 hour set

BOY BETTER KNOW

HEARTLESS CREW

GEENEUS

WILEY

ZINC

GHETTO

N-TYPE

CRAZY COUSINZ MC VERSATILE

KATY B

SPYRO

YOUNGSTA

HEADHUNTER

ONEMAN

RAMADANMAN

SUPA D

DISTANCE

BROCKIE (Jungle set)

COOLY G

FLOATING POINTS

CRAZY D

TIPPA

STAMINA

Order your tickets here

Kristian

Newham Generals – Generally Speaking Revisited

September 21, 2009

As the Generals release Hard, their creepy David Rodigan sampling collabo with Breakage, I think it’s time to take stock and revisit their debut release, Generally Speaking.

Generally Speaking, Newham Generals much-anticipated debut CD was released in April to some seriously mixed reviews. The Observer’s Hugh Montgomery (whose name would suggest the nearest he’s come to ‘weed’ is when there is a ‘t’ prefixing it) said the album ‘didn’t bear close inspection’, whilst the Times’ Pete Paphides enjoyed the ‘joie de vivre’ displayed in the pair’s delivery…

Since when did right wing papers speak more favourably about Grime than left wing ones?!

Fans held similarly opposing views about the album. Some thought that after three years in the making, the albums’ impact wasn’t as emphatic as it could have been; songs such as ‘Heard You Been Smoking’ and ‘Pepper’ considered little more than meanderings from their chosen Grime path.

Others welcomed the new direction and celebrated the re-working of those wheel-triggering live bars we all know and love, into equally fitting pieces of music. The fact that the album paid little or no regard to genre constraints or the notoriously narrow expectations of fans was, to them at least, a bonus.

Personally, I can see it from both points of view. Whilst the vision for the album was spot-on; a CD full of new music uninhibited by genre, it wasn’t executed as well as it could have been. The vocal effects and rave parallels only muddied its line of attack. ‘Heard You’ve Been Smoking’ was terrible, and, as an adult male, ‘Bell Dem Slags’ was embarrassing. Either could, and should, have been replaced by this:

This was all over radio sets promoting the album and yet, come the CD release was nowhere to be seen. An ideal opportunity for the lads to showcase their playful side and bring those Yard vibes to the table was unfortunately missed.

If there was one line of consensus throughout, it was that the stomping ‘Supadupe’ and Prodigy-esque roller and lead single ‘Head Get Mangled’ were undeniable NG classics. Logan’s vocal mash-up (Link) of Double’s verses on ‘Supadupe’ and ‘Frontline’ has to be one of the Grime recordings of 2009.

The release of NG’s album was positioned as an epochal-defining moment in Grime ever since it was on the cards. Yet, five months on, it is hardly being mentioned. With their next release, Foots and Dee should take heed of the fact that their music need not masquerade as some kind of ravey-Grime mash-up, or tie itself up in controversy. They have that Grime and Dubstep hybrid on lock, they should act as such.

There was enough promise on Generally Speaking to work with. Let’s hope that for the next release, the mighty Newham Generals play to their strengths and keep it Yard, hard, but most importantly, fun. Working with Breakage therefore, is a step in the right direction.

Kristian