Archive for April, 2010

Logan Sama’s April 2010 Round Up

April 30, 2010

In terms of radio, Chosen Ones Part 2 was a great start to April. We worked with different MC’s and concepts this time, keeping the format fun and fresh. As I mentioned here last month, I wanted a Yardie set for Part 2 and I got one with Killa P, Badness, Shizzle and Jamakabi! It was definitely one of my favourite sets. Double S held down a set on his own (as the rest of Marvell couldn’t make it) for 25 minutes which was very impressive – I’m sure even his critics on the internet would have to agree.

We also had Trim and his Circle, as well as exciting new talent in the form of Dream Mclean, Teeza, Voltage, Onoe and Scruface – the latter an MC who I have high hopes for this year. We are going to keep the Chosen Ones series going and I know people are wondering why I haven’t opted for bigger names so far. However, I’m going to be doing a new Chosen Ones show every six weeks now and as such I don’t want to recycle sets. We are going to get sets from Ruff Sqwad, Cold Blooded, Boy Better Know, Movement and maybe Slew Dem in the summer…rest assured we’ll be doing what the people want to hear! I don’t want it to just be the same show with Newham Gens and Bloodline appearing every week – despite what some may demand!

Chosen Ones gives me the opportunity to feature people from across the UK too, MC’s outside of London – Midlands, up North etc. It’s otherwise hard for me to give exposure to these guys with a one hour show on a commercial station. Kiss management are still giving really positive feedback; they’re really happy with both the Radio listener figures and the web hits. Hopefully, if we can sustain the effort then we might have a two hour show again!

The Grime Forum awards were another April highlight for me. I didn’t even realise I had won the best DJ award – I naturally assumed Spyro had won. There are many things that make a DJ ‘good’ and in light of this award I‘d like to think I’m now alright at most of them! It was a pleasure to receive the award. The fact that the organisers had clubbed together and made a physical award that I can actually keep was special. I made a big deal of it and specifically invited P Money and Blacks down so we could give the awards credibility. Last year the awards came and went. This year, I felt that giving Grime Forum credence on the radio was needed.

People that are doing work should be rewarded for their efforts; Tempa T getting best song and best video, P Money winning best MC and best mixtape and Blacks winning best newcomer was all down to the Grime Scene – not the mainstream/playlist world. It was real fans saying what the hottest shit was this year. I heard Skepta say that for him, this was the first time he had seen a list of award winners and completely agreed with it. Unfortunately, the Grime Daily party didn’t go nearly as well. All I’ll say is it is a shame incidents like that still happen – they are a poignant reminder of what is really going on in the world at the moment. The name ‘Grime’ is very precious and we have to be careful what we attach it to…

Going back to Skepta, he’s currently remixing P Diddy’s ‘Hello Good Morning’ which is big news for Grime. I know Skepta wants to do a big Grime club smasher, so we’ll see what comes of it. As with anybody big dipping their toes in Grime, we’ll have to use it and get as much exposure as possible. It’s good that somebody like Diddy, coming from America, looks to the UK and picks a Grime artist to work with. It’s a step in the right direction when people look over here and see Grime as our equivalent of Hip Hop.

As you may have seen on here and on my own blog, I’m a bit of a Street Fighter fan! A nice surprise this week was D Double’s vocal of Swerve’s Street Fighter Riddim. I had no idea Dee was going to vocal it, in fact the first I knew was when I received a text from Laurence at Dirtee Stank saying ‘D Double’s Street Fighter Freestyle is Fucked!’ I rang him straight back! I got sent it and it was like two of my favourite things mixed together. A special made for me (almost)! In terms of the actual game, I’m really enjoying it. I actually want to get good at this version as me and Jamie are thinking about going to some tournaments and trying our luck.

I’ve been trying to work with Dudley, but like any new character it’s hard at first. As he only punches, using him effectively is quite technical, but once he gets in there he can do some damage!

As a final note, look out for B-Live’s Modern Warfare release this month, which comes with a massive, MASSIVE remix as well as the Sharky Major and Badness CD’s. I would like to say a big thank you to everyone that supported the ‘Shark Attack’ single because it was a bit of a gamble, but it paid off. J Beatz, Nuklea and Z-Dot instrumental EP’s are coming soon. In terms of gigs, if you want to keep up to date with where I’m playing check my blog, http://www.keepinitgrimy.blogspot.com. I’m looking forward to playing Hip Hop Kemp in the Czech Republic this summer, as it’s all good fun and hopefully I shall be going to San Francisco in May…Fingers crossed!

Until next month…Keep it Grimy!

Logan.

LCD Soundsystem – Drunk Girls

April 29, 2010

Pretty funny video, and not a bad little tune either! Directed by Spike Jonze.

James

Royal T Beat Blog 2 – Kick Out

April 28, 2010

royal

Every month on Welcome To The Fold, Grime producer Royal-T airs rarities, sketches, samples, remixes and other work from his archive. This month, Royal T presents ‘Kick Out.’

Royal T – Kick Out by Threefold_Media

‘Kick Out’ is just a fast-paced beat that I made to bring hype to a set. No special piano solos or big synth lines – just something simple. I made the original beat ages ago and in the video below you can see Blacks spitting over it:

Looking about on my hard drive I rediscovered this beauty and decided to give it a little update before releasing it again. I kept the intro quite minimal so it could bang into something hard, but keep a continuous melody and theme so the anticipation builds and builds. In terms of inspiration, Buddha Finger, Storm and tracks from that era had a similar kind of dark energy.

This tune is typical of my style – retro touches incorporated into Grime music, although I try and stay away from gimmickry. Sometimes I picture my tunes as backing music for Movie and Game Trailers. On the drops for example I see explosions, fight scenes and car chases. In fact, try playing this over a Street Fighter 4 trailer and it fits really well!

The sample is there to break up the rhythm and add focus to the tune. When I first made it, I envisioned Jammer spitting over it because of his appearance on Wiley’s ’16 Bar Rally’. I think he’d suit the early 2000 vibe.

My ‘Hot Ones’ remix is released this month on Butterz so go support that! Also watch out for my ‘Air Bubble’ remix coming out soon on limited edition clear vinyl and my ‘Stomp’ remix for Big Shot. I’m also working on my new E.P. watch out for more news on that coming soon!

Enjoy!

Royal-T

Summer Movie Mash Up

April 28, 2010

Screenrants Mike Eisenberg has compiled a trailer of teasers featuring the expected heavy hitters this summer. Keep an eye out for Edgar Wright’s Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World – THWACK!

Dré

Friday Feeling #9

April 23, 2010

friday

Lemongrass Iced Tea

Your weapons:

2 oz. Bourbon
4 oz. Ginger Beer
1 oz. Lemongrass syrup, (Monin for example)
A handful of fresh mint leaves

Grab a Collins glass
Muddle fresh mint with ice.
Add bourbon.
Drizzle the Lemongrass.
Top with ginger beer.
Ease back…

Dré

Marvel vs. Capcom 3

April 22, 2010

capcom logo

After a decade of anticipation, yesterday Capcom officially announced the third installment of the Marvel vs. Capcom franchise. It will the first in the series to use three-dimensional graphics; similar to that of Street Fighter IV.

With Super Street Fighter IV due later this month, it appears we may be heading back to the good old days when an annual Capcom beat ’em up left egos bruised, fingers sore and friendships broken.

dhalsim

The MvC team will be using Capcom’s MT Framework engine. The same engine seen in Resident Evil 5 and the eagerly anticipated Lost Planet 2. Although this teaser suggests a cel-shaded, comic book aesthetic.

Expect Marvel Vs. Capcom 3 on shelves Spring 2011.

Here’s the teaser:

Interview with producer Ryouta Niizuma.

Video courtesy of Gamespot

Dré

Interview with Gabriel Heatwave

April 20, 2010

I first discovered The Heatwave through a recorded set they did with Riko in 2007. Since then, I’ve been regularly checking their website for the latest Dancehall news, reviews and mixsets, which for me, have always been on point. Following their massive ’25 years of Dancehall’ mix on Rinse a few weeks ago, we at The ‘Fold thought it was about time we shone some light on The Heatwave and brought focus to the massively important work they do for the UK scene.

We tracked down head honcho Gabriel and pinned him down for a chat:

First of all, please introduce yourself to all our readers, and tell them what it is you do!

Hi, I’m Gabriel and as part of Dancehall collective The Heatwave, I DJ around the UK and Europe. Our new night ‘Energy’ is about to be launched at Driver, King’s Cross. We mainly play Jamaican dancehall music, especially where it crosses over with UK sounds. We all grew up with Garage and Grime and where those two genres cross over into Dancehall is what we are interested in! We also write a blog and host The Heatwave radio show on Rinse, that’s dedicated to all Jamaican sounds.

How did you get into dancehall and what was it about the sound that appealed to you?

Although I was into reggae and stuff when I was younger, I started DJ’ing Hiphop. I moved to Spain in 2001 and there were no decent record shops selling underground Hiphop were I was. However, there was a reggae shop and so I started to purchase records. After a while I had had enough of rap and stopped playing it. I found Dancehall – the uptempo stuff especially – much more lively and appealing. People could dance to it! Also, it was really easy to get hold of the classics whereas 90’s Hiphop classics were really hard to find. With Reggae they reissue stuff all the time, even if it’s just bootlegs. I found I could get all the massive hits from as far back as 20 years ago.

You are the brains behind The Heatwave – a monthly club night that has since grown to incorporate a record label, a radio show, a website and blog. How did it all come about and what was the idea behind this multi-faceted approach?

It has all been accidental really. The Heatwave started as a night we put on in 2003. We had just moved back to London, and wanted to a monthly gig. At that time, in London, there were monthly gigs but outside of it there was nothing really going on. It was at a time when people were starting to pay attention to dancehall again but no one was doing it properly, just Hiphop DJ’s playing the occasional tune here and there. The website followed much later than that, and the blog even later – about 2007.

We started our Rinse show started last year.

What has it been like on Rinse?

I really like it there. We’re the only dancehall show and everybody else is quite different. In a way we feel out of place, but I think what we do works really well. Dancehall and Jamaican music generally, is at the root of what most of the other DJ’s play. Rinse started as a jungle station and everything they’ve done since, be it Grime, Dubstep or Funky, Dancehall has had a massive impact on.

We do our own thing but by being on Rinse, you know the people listening are going to have a deeper appreciation of the music.

In that respect Rinse has its own heritage…

Yeah definitely. Rinse listeners see the links between Jamaican and UK music and to them it makes a lot of sense us being on there. As such we tailor what we do to that audience. A recent example was a show we did about ‘Fastchat’ – an MC style that originated in London in the ‘80’s and was the starting point of what we now recognise as Jungle and Grime MC’ing. We like to highlight that sort of thing on Rinse for a more discerning audience.

Any plans for a Rinse CD?

I have – I don’t know if they have yet! Haha! But no, I have spoken to them about it and we’re possibly doing a Funky Bashment thing, but there are a number of ways we could approach it. There is so much cross pollination in terms of music between London and Jamaica – much more so now with the internet making more collaborations possible…

In those terms your recent ‘Funky Bashment’ mix was really important on a musical level. Not only did you mix Jamaican and British styles together, but you also introduced listeners to the variety of Afrobeat influences that are popular right now and are at the heart of the Funky scene. Could we be seeing the start of a new pan-African musicial movement in the UK that borrows from Jamaica, England and Africa?

I’m no musicologist, but with Funky specifically and some second generation Grime, there definitely seems to have been a shift. In the 80’s, UK black music was all about the Caribbean but now the focus seems to have changed. What is interesting is that, like you say, whilst the UK still looks to Jamaica, Dancehall is now really big in West Africa. The African influence in Jamaican music has always been there –Mento etc – but I’ve noticed in the last year or two that there has been more African-inspired Dancehall production.

Check out a producer called Kirkledove who’s a drummer and makes tracks with lots of African percussion. He’s a good example and has made hits for Mr Vegas amongst others.

Riko @ The Heatwave, 2007

You are known for predominantly playing dancehall but you also dabble in Grime, and in fact the first I heard of The Heatwave was when I stumbled across your set with Riko Dan from 2007. What do you like about the genre and who are your favourite artists?

I like Grime Mc’s like Riko and Durrty Goodz who have the Ragga Jamaican-influenced flows. Saying that, my absolute favourite Grime MC is Wiley and although he has that Jamaican influence, he doesn’t tend to chat in Patois like Killa P, Badness or Riko do.

One of the most interesting facets of Grime is the ‘versioning’ culture it imbibed from Reggae and Dancehall. After a brief hiatus, riddim versions are starting to make come back, as recently demonstrated by S-X’s Wooo Riddim. How important are Riddims to the vitality Grime scene do you think?

I really like having a load of artists versioning Riddims. One of my favourite Grime records is ‘Ice Rink!’ What I like about versioning – and the way they do it in Jamaica – is that it puts all the MC’s on one level so you can immediately compare them. It’s difficult to compare two different MC’s if they spit on two different beats – it’s hard to tell whether the beat makes the difference, or the MC.

I also like the fact that by having loads of versions, different DJ’s can pick out different ones and popularise them. DJ’s tend to play about 3-4 cuts on the same riddim, so if there are 15 versions, everyone can do something different.

Riko & Godsgift @ The Heatwave

How long do you think it will be before Grime can achieve the same kind of self-sufficient industry that dancehall enjoys?

By looking at the way Grime, Dubstep and Funky have developed, I’ll never understand why they are treated as different genres. I look at what has happened in London over the last 20 years and see massive parallels with what has happened in Jamaica. Back in the day, scenes were coming and going, styles were coming and going, uncles, cousins and children were each following in the footsteps of their family…This is why there are so many links between Dancehall in 1995 to Dancehall now.

Now look at Jungle in 1995 and Funky now in 2010 and the same links are there! The same record shops, producers, promoters, radio stations. There is all that continuity in this country and yet everyone slips up and ignores it, instead defining themselves by their scene and genres…

Is that a trait specific to the UK?

I don’t know, but I can’t think why we’re so different, so parochial. The infrastructure is there, it should have been used for Grime and Funky. Saying that it is getting better with so much cross pollination between scenes – it’s great.

25 Years of Dancehall

Your recent ‘25 Years of Dancehall Show’ on Rinse – whereby you played one distinctive record from each year from 1985 until now was, for me, an enjoyable and educational listen. What was it like trying to compile records for the show?

It was really difficult! In the end I did it by artist and tried to list 25 artists that I couldn’t leave out. It was a slightly weird way of doing it as inevitably certain tunes – one hit wonders etc – got left out. But we got the key artists in there and anyway, the mix was never meant to be a finite.

What was the feedback from the ’25 Years’ mix?

I’ve had loads of really positive feedback. Because I’m so immersed in the music I think I sometimes forget that just because I know who did what when, when a certain style changed etc, casual listeners don’t. In that sense, the mix did a good job and because I did it by artist, anyone can look into their back catalogues and find out more.

Do you plan to do similar mixes in future?

It’s something I’ve always been interested in and is, in part, my aim in doing all of this. I feel like Dancehall is under-represented despite having such a massive influence in modern music – no mean feat considering it’s come from a small Caribbean island. The Heatwave shows people the history and the importance of Dancehall as well as being totally about the music and having fun.

Wayne Smith

‘Under Mi Sleng Teng’ released by Wayne Smith in 1985 was a phenomenally important record for dancehall. Can you just highlight for us just why that it is?

‘Sleng Teng’ is often credited as the first digital reggae record, which isn’t quite true, but it was the catalyst in everyone in Jamaica dumping their instruments and going digital. Given what has happened since then, that event has been phenomenally important even though not everyone saw it as a positive thing at the time.

After ‘Sleng Teng’ dropped, everyone was interested in drum machines and digital sounds rather than instruments. I’m not slighting analogue instruments, but going digital allowed many producers to do innovative things. One thing that I find amazing about ‘Sleng Teng’ and indeed with many older digital dancehall cuts is that they don’t sound dated in the same way the Happy Mondays do now, even though they used similar drum machine equipment.

In the ’25 years’ show, you sight the Diwali Riddim as being important in terms of the sounds progression. What did it introduce to Dancehall?

Diwali Riddim was a new kind of rhythm – a 4/4 beat. It had been done before but after Diwali it was copied hugely over the next few years. It also paved the way for the Coolie Dance Riddim the year after, which in a way was more significant commercially as it was a little faster – closer to a house tempo. The other thing Diwali did, by using Indian sounding samples, was open peoples’ minds to Asian and Oriental influences.

What do you think will become the next big theme in Dancehall musically or lyrically?

One of the things I think will be big at Carnival this year will be the Triple Bounce Riddim, which has got versions by Vybz Kartel and Movado. Also I think the African sound will get bigger, as it’s still sounding new.
We’ll be pushing the Funky Bashment thing, trying to get as many Jamaican artists to collaborate as we can. Not a huge amount have been taking up on it so far, but people like Sticky are going to be working with a lot more Jamaican artists this year. Tunes like ‘Party Hard’ by Doneao have been doing really well in the Caribbean recently too.

You compiled ‘An England Story’ – a compilation CD of English MC tracks across 25 years. Were you pleased with how it was received and are there plans to do another?

Yeah I thought it went down really well and it had that educational feel. I feel like it has helped change the way UK MC’s are viewed and brought focus to the progression being made here. It annoys me that people take their MC cues from America rather than Jamaica – comparing Dizzee to rappers as opposed to Vybz Kartel for example. It’s annoying and wrong. Culturally our MC’s operate in a way closer to the Jamaican industry.

I have already pencilled a tracklisting for a follow up, but what I want to do with this one is fashion one CD as a retrospective, and the other as an illustration of what is happening now.

Which UK Dancehall artists should people look out for?


Lady Chann
, Gappy Ranks, YT, Serocee, Doctor and Riko.

And finally, what is next for The Heatwave?

The plan is to focus on production and as such we have a tune with Serocee out next month. Other than that it’s just going to be more DJ’ing and more gigs! We also have our weekly night at Driver, Kings Cross, which commences this Thursday. Plus we hope to be reaching Jamaica soon to record.

Check out:

The Heatwave website
The Heatwave on Rinse
The Heatwave on Facebook
Gabriel on Twitter

Many thanks to Gabriel for this in-depth interview. Look out for more schoolings from him in the near future.

Kristian

Unsung Heroes of The Hop.

April 20, 2010

Today, the late great Guru (17.07.66-19.04.10)

guru

I have vague memories of my twelfth birthday. I know there was a cake involved – that much is certain. There are however, some items that still remain with me. A collection of tapes that my dad would pass me with each celebration. Now, on this particular day, a rather special tape presented itself beneath the usual jeans, tee’s and socks.

On it was simply ‘Over 12

You see, I had grown up on a steady diet of Tribe, De la Soul, Miles and the expressives that were suited to 11 year old ears. But now, shit, I was twelve, damn near a man! Who was my Dad to stand in the way of that divine duo Gangstarr?

Guru and Gangstarr meant more than just an effortless flow over jazz induced boom bap. It was a rite of passage. I was now at a time in my life when I could fully engage with the music with no restrictions – no fucking top 40. That day and that tape will stay with me for the rest of my life and I thank Guru for playing his part in that transition.

guru

Guru is the definitive unsung hero of the hop. It was Gangstarr who pioneered a new sound that acknowledged its humble jazz traditions. These effects still resonate strongly today in the monotone, staccato flows of the dirty south to the new jazz offerings of Pharell, Kanye and co. The Jazzmatazz movement bridged the gap even further; Guru dipped his toes into muddier territory with the likes of Courtney Pine, Jamiroquai and hundreds of open minded artists, while we, the avid listeners lamented the dream duo split but nodded melancholy nonetheless.

Although I am shocked at the news of his passing. I take solace in over decades of treasured work and the memories of that twelfth birthday.

Over 12

R.I.P Keith Elam (17.07.66-19.04.10)

Now listen.




Lemonade was a popular drink and it still is/
I get more props and stunts than Bruce Willis.

Never gets old!

Dré

South Park Turns 200

April 13, 2010

Mel Gibson, Kanye West and David Blaine will have their revenge on the little town of Colorado in an upcoming milestone episode, it has been announced. The cartoon’s 200th episode, simply titled 200, sees the residents of South Park subject to a class action lawsuit by the celebrities satirised during the shows 14-year history.

South Park co-creators Matt Stone and Trey Parker speak with Boing Boing’s Xeni Jardin on the eve of the 200th episode of the hit Comedy Central series. Stone and Parker reveal their plans to revisit battles over the boundaries of what can and cannot be done on television—including a quest to see just how many celebrities they can manage to piss off in a single episode, and whether Comedy Central will once again try to stop them from depicting the image and voice of a cartoon version of the Muslim prophet Mohammed on the show.

Courtesy of Boing Boing.

Dré

Friday Feeling #8

April 9, 2010

friday feeling

The Crush

This works equally well as a short or long drink.
Preferably Third World style.

What you will need:

3 ounces of Dry Gin.
1 1/2 ounces of Patron Citronge.
A splash Club Soda.
Slices of fresh orange.
1 deserted beach.

Muddle orange in a rocks glass.
Add ice, then gin,
Citronage and soda to suit.
Stir.
Relax

96 Degrees in the Shade…bloody philistines!

Dré